CURRENT ISSUE

EIA 29.4 Cover_featured

Winter 2015 (Issue 29.4)

| December 11, 2015

ENTIRE ISSUE FREE FOR A LIMITED TIME!

This issue includes essays by Alexander Betts on the global refugee regime and Andrej Zwitter on big data and international affairs; a roundtable on global governance, featuring contributions by Thomas Weiss and Rorden Wilkinson, Craig Murphy, Catherine Weaver, Susan Park, and Roland Paris; a feature by James Pattison on the ethics of arming rebels; and review essays by Michael Garcia Bochenek on children’s rights and Deen Chatterjee on democracy in the global age.






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BLOG

Revisiting the Management of Pluralism

| January 12, 2016

The recent migration surge into Europe and the United States raises profound questions of demographic and cultural pluralism.






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Global Governance and Keystone States

| January 6, 2016

Critical challenges—environmental collapse, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism and crime, and state collapse—pose existential questions to the continued existence of nation-states.






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The Ethics of Arming Rebels and U.S. Policy—A Clash?

| January 5, 2016

Having encouraged rebels to continue to fight by providing weapons and financial support, do sponsors have the duty to ensure their side can actually win and take power?






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ROUNDTABLE: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

Introduction: Drivers and Change in Global Governance

The purpose of this roundtable is to continue to push outward the boundaries of what we understand as “global governance.”






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The Rise of China: Continuity or Change in the Global Governance of Development

| December 11, 2015

Exercising its vast material power, China is rapidly becoming a top lender in the bilateral field, and it is asserting its alternative ideas on aid funding and development cooperation.






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Voluntary Standard Setting: Drivers and Consequences

| December 11, 2015

The voluntary consensus standard-setting system is a part of global governance most of us encounter frequently, but rarely notice. What are the drivers and consequences of changes in that system?






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Change and Continuity in Global Governance

Scholars must frame bigger questions about the history and future of global governance, and prescribe course corrections and formulate strategies for a more stable and just world order.






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Governing the Environment: Three Motivating Factors

| December 11, 2015

What motivates agents to change global governance arrangements? A look at governance of the environment provides answers.






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FEATURES

The Ethics of Arming Rebels

| December 11, 2015

Arming rebels is generally impermissible and only exceptionally morally permissible–even when rebels are engaged in unjust wars.






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Unethical Consumption and Obligations to Signal

| September 9, 2015

To bring about an end to the harms involved in the production of everyday goods, what should the individual do?






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The Responsibility to Protect Turns Ten

| June 12, 2015

The Responsibility to Protect has become an established international norm associated with positive changes to the way that international society responds to genocide and mass atrocities. With only a few exceptions, states accept that they have committed to RtoP and agree on the principle’s core elements.






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BOOK SYMPOSIUM: THE THIN JUSTICE OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

Response to Critics of The Thin Justice of International Law

| June 4, 2015

In this, the final contribution to our online symposium, Ratner responds to critics of his book.






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Reflections on The Thin Justice of International Law: Peace, Justice, and Secession

| June 3, 2015

I maintain contra Ratner that peace should not be characterized as a component (or, in his language, a pillar) of justice. This dispute over the relationship between peace and justice matters, I contend, even if it rarely leads to different prescriptions.






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The Role of Ideal Theory in Developing an Applied Ethics of International Law

| June 2, 2015

In his book, Steven Ratner impressively integrates the concerns and perspectives of international lawyers with a philosophically compelling normative analysis, demonstrating by example the importance of such an integrated assessment.






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