CURRENT ISSUE

Winter 2016 (Issue 30.4)

| December 14, 2016

We are pleased to announce the publication of the fourth issue in EIA’s 30th anniversary volume. This issue includes an essay by Kristy A. Belton on the UNHCR’s global #IBelong Campaign to eradicate statelessness, the first of a two-part series; a feature by Tim Meijers and Marlies Glasius on the expressivist potential of international criminal courts; a book symposium on Allen Buchanan‘s The Heart of Human Rights, featuring articles by Pietro Maffettone, David Miller, Andrea Sangiovanni, Jesse Tomalty, Lorenzo Zucca, and a response from Allen Buchanan; a review essay by Jennifer C. Rubenstein on the lessons of effective altruism; and book reviews.






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BLOG

Democracy Promotion and a Trump Administration

| February 21, 2017

What happens to the democracy promotion enterprise in a Trump administration? The President’s comments that under his watch the United States will not be seeking to impose its system or values on other countries suggests that the spread and strengthening of democratic systems around the world will not be a top priority and in fact […]

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What We’ve Been Reading

| February 16, 2017

Welcome to our roundup of news and current events related to ethics and international affairs! Here’s what we’ve been reading this February.






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Upcoming Conferences of Interest 2017

| February 6, 2017

We have compiled a list of upcoming conferences related to the fields of ethics and international affairs through the end of 2017. We hope you find something that interests you!






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BOOK SYMPOSIUM

Introduction

| December 14, 2016

The last few decades have seen a lively philosophical debate surrounding human rights. Allen Buchanan’s book The Heart of Human Rights constitutes an important and novel contribution to this debate, focusing on the moral dimensions of international legal human rights (ILHRs) and the institutions responsible for their existence and implementation.






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Human Rights and Status Egalitarianism

| December 14, 2016

In this essay, Miller throws doubt on Allen Buchanan’s claim that to understand the system of international legal human rights, we must acknowledge not only their “well-being function” but also a second function that he calls their “status egalitarian function.”






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Justifying International Legal Human Rights

| December 14, 2016

In this essay, Tomalty argues that Buchanan’s alternative account of the justification of ILHRs is problematic. Rejecting the “Mirroring View” does not entail the irrelevance of moral human rights to the justification of the content of ILHRs.






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Human Rights: A Plea for Taking the Law and Institutions Seriously

| December 14, 2016

Buchanan responds to some of the points made by each of the contributors to the symposium, making his case for taking international laws and institutions seriously and urging scholars to continue this discussion.






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FEATURES

Trials as Messages of Justice: What Should Be Expected of International Criminal Courts?

| December 14, 2016

After more than a decade of work, the accomplishments of the International Criminal Court are highly contested. In this article, the authors ask, what can and should we expect from international criminal courts? How can international trial and punishment constitute a suitable response to episodes of mass violence?






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Self-Interest and the Distant Vulnerable

| September 15, 2016

What interests do states have in assisting and protecting vulnerable populations beyond their borders? Today, confronted as we are with civil wars, mass atrocities, and humanitarian catastrophes that have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of civilians and generated the displacement of sixty million more, this question is as urgent as it has ever been.






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Should International Courts Use Public Reason?

| September 15, 2016

Is public reason an appropriate ideal for international courts? Since the early 1990s various political philosophers and legal scholars have argued that supreme courts should “use public reason” or abide by an “ideal of public reason.”






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BOOK REVIEWS

On War and Democracy by Christopher Kutz

| December 14, 2016

There is a fundamental ethical dilemma confronting all democratic states: if they intervene in violence-ridden contexts, then they are readily accused of double standards. On War and Democracy avoids this ethical and political dilemma by beating what could be called a double retreat.






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Taking Sides in Peacekeeping: Impartiality and the Future of the United Nations by Emily Paddon Rhoads

| December 14, 2016

The norm of impartiality is pivotal to the United Nations’ activities in the areas of conflict resolution, mediation, peacekeeping, humanitarian action, and adjudication. In recent years, however, the organization’s principled adherence to impartiality has come under scrutiny.






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The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World by Oliver Morton

| December 14, 2016

In this book, Morton’s central question is whether solar geoengineering ought to be part of society’s climate policy portfolio. The author educates, illuminates, and helps the reader connect the dots, but he does not take sides. Instead, he elevates the debate to a new level that acknowledges the enormous trade-offs involved.






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