CURRENT ISSUE

Spring 2017 (Issue 31.1)

| March 10, 2017

The Spring 2017 issue includes essays by Michael Ignatieff on human rights and the ordinary virtues; Kristy A. Belton on the prospect of ending statelessness in the Americas, the second of a two-part series; and Carmen Gómez Martín on the problematic nature of refugee camps as de facto long-term solutions. It also contains two features, one by Dan Bulley and the other by Alise Coen, presenting differing views on the relationship between the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) and the refugee protection regime, with a brief introduction by Jason Ralph and James Souter; a review essay on immigration ethics by Linda Bosniak; and three book reviews.






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BLOG

The Yemen Raid and the Grievability of Lives Lost

| March 6, 2017

Framing the debate about the Yemen raid around whether President Trump is to blame misses other crucial matters that ought to be explored, particularly about whose lives are considered grievable and about the function of grief in the silencing of critique.






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The Great Divide: Democracy’s Future

| March 5, 2017

I had the opportunity this past Saturday to take part in a day-long conference, “The Great Divide: Democracy’s Future” (sponsored by American University’s School of Public Affairs Graduate Student Council and the Graduate Leadership Council.) This symposium, in many ways, picked right up from the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs fall 2016 event […]

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Democracy Promotion and a Trump Administration

| February 21, 2017

What happens to the democracy promotion enterprise in a Trump administration? The President’s comments that under his watch the United States will not be seeking to impose its system or values on other countries suggests that the spread and strengthening of democratic systems around the world will not be a top priority and in fact […]

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ESSAYS

Human Rights, Global Ethics, and the Ordinary Virtues

| March 10, 2017

Drawing on research from site-visits to eight countries, this essay explores whether human rights has become a global ethic, and, if so, how the concept of human rights influences or structures private moral decision-making.






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Heeding the Clarion Call in the Americas: The Quest to End Statelessness

| March 10, 2017

In 2014, the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees launched the #IBelong Campaign to eradicate statelessness by 2024. Given that UN Secretary-General António Guterres and others have identified the Americas as having the potential to be the first region to end statelessness, this essay evaluates the region’s progress towards that goal.






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Ending Statelessness Through Belonging: A Transformative Agenda?

| December 14, 2016

The subject of belonging conjures up a realm of emotions. This essay explores statelessness through the prism of belonging, asking whether the United Nations Refugee Agency’s reframing of statelessness as an issue of belonging can be successful in eradicating statelessness globally.






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FEATURES

Shame on EU? Europe, RtoP, and the Politics of Refugee Protection

| March 10, 2017

In this feature, Dan Bulley argues that there is little to be gained by invoking the RtoP norm in the context of the refugee crisis. Rather than bolstering the EU’s protection mechanisms, RtoP effectively authorizes the EU’s current treatment of refugees.






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Capable and Culpable? The United States, RtoP, and Refugee Responsibility-Sharing

| March 10, 2017

In this feature, Alise Coen takes as given that facilitating refugee protection represents an essential step towards upholding the norm of RtoP. By examining the past policy decisions of the United States, the article argues for culpability as a criterion for assessing responsibilities to refugees, and shows how upholding these responsibilities can align with state interests.






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Trials as Messages of Justice: What Should Be Expected of International Criminal Courts?

| December 14, 2016

After more than a decade of work, the accomplishments of the International Criminal Court are highly contested. In this article, the authors ask, what can and should we expect from international criminal courts? How can international trial and punishment constitute a suitable response to episodes of mass violence?






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BOOK REVIEWS

Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History by Markus Gunneflo

| March 10, 2017

Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History, Markus Gunneflo (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), 290 pp., $110 cloth. Targeted killing is one of the most controversial topics in contemporary legal, ethical, and political discussion, and the literature on it has grown enormously over the past decade. Markus Gunneflo’s Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History is […]

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The Global Transformation: History, Modernity and the Making of International Relations by Barry Buzan and George Lawson

| March 10, 2017

The Global Transformation: History, Modernity and the Making of International Relations, Barry Buzan and George Lawson (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 421 pp., $29.99 paper, $98 cloth. This important and impressive book argues that international relations as we know it today was born in the nineteenth century. Buzan and Lawson argue that both the substance […]

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Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World by Leif Wenar

| March 10, 2017

Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World, Leif Wenar (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015), 552 pp., $34.95 cloth. In 1865, upon witnessing firsthand the destitution of the urban poor of Moscow, Leo Tolstoy felt compelled to write What Then Must We Do? He was concerned that the condition of the poor […]

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