CURRENT ISSUE

Winter 2017 (Issue 31.4)

| December 8, 2017

We are pleased to announce the publication of the Fall 2017 issue of Ethics & International Affairs! This issue contains essays by Jonathan D. Caverley on how to slow the proliferation of major conventional weapons and Janos Pasztor on why international governance of geoengineering is so desperately needed; a roundtable on the overlapping relationship between the laws and the ethics of war, with contributions from David LubanValerie MorkeviciusJames Turner Johnson, and Edward Barrett; a feature by Christopher J. Preston comparing the moral culpability of a carbon emitter versus that of a benevolent climate engineer, with responses from Holly Lawford-SmithSikina Jinnah and Douglas Bushey, and Mike Hulme; and book reviews from Michael GoodhartRyan JenkinsSophie RosenbergAnna Stilz, and Matt Zwolinski.

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ROUNDTABLE: LAWS OF WAR AND JWT

Introduction: The Roles of International Law and Just War Theory

This roundtable explores the complex relationship between the laws of war and just war theory, and emphasizes the continuing importance of maintaining parallel ethical and legal conversations on how wars should be fought.

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ESSAYS

Slowing the Proliferation of Major Conventional Weapons: The Virtues of an Uncompetitive Market

| December 8, 2017

Proliferation of major conventional weapons (MCW) is at best a waste of valuable resources and at worst fuel for more and bloodier conflicts. In this essay, Jonathan D. Caverley shows how the United States, pursuing its own political interests, leverages its massive market power to slow the proliferation of MCW.

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FEATURES

Carbon Emissions, Stratospheric Aerosol Injection, and Unintended Harms

| December 8, 2017

In this article, Christopher J. Preston compares the culpability for any unintended harms resulting from stratospheric aerosol injection versus culpability for the unintended harms already taking place due to carbon emissions. To make this comparison, both types of unintended harms are viewed through the lens of the doctrine of double effect.

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Rising Powers, Responsibility, and International Society

| September 8, 2017

This article examines statements made by rising powers Brazil, China, and India in UN Security Council meetings between 2011 and 2016 to identify their perspectives on which international actors are responsible and what constitutes responsible action. Gaskarth then analyzes these statements in light of English School theory on responsibility and international society.

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BOOK REVIEWS

Reconstructing Human Rights: A Pragmatist and Pluralist Inquiry into Global Ethics by Joe Hoover

| December 8, 2017

In Reconstructing Human Rights, Joe Hoover locates the value of human rights in the work that they do in the world. He seeks to develop a pragmatic account that makes sense of rights as they are without attempting to deny the various tensions and contradictions that they present.

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Ethics and Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in the Age of Digital Warfare by George Lucas

| December 8, 2017

George Lucas’s Ethics and Cyber Warfare contributes much-needed scaffolding for discussions about cyber governance. He introduces a new category of cyber conflict, identifies emerging norms in cyberspace, and provides a qualified defense of the National Security Administration’s surveillance infrastructure.

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