CURRENT ISSUE

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Fall 2016 (Issue 30.3)

| September 14, 2016

The third issue in EIA’s 30th anniversary volume includes essays by Nicholas Chan on the bottom-up architecture of the Paris climate change agreement, Jens Bartelson on the history of recognition, and Karin Aggestam and Annika Bergman-Rosamond on Swedish feminist foreign policy; features by Luke Glanville on self-interest and the distant vulnerable, and by Silje Aambø Langvatn on the use of public reason in international courts; a review essay by James K. Galbraith on ethics and inequality; a response by Ryan Jenkins and Duncan Purves to Robert Sparrow’s article on autonomous weapon systems (EIA 30.1), with a rejoinder by Robert Sparrow; and book reviews by Michael C. Williams and Jonathan Morduch.






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BLOG

Pessimism and the Liberal Order

| September 14, 2016

Is the pessimism that I expressed about the sustainability of the liberal order at the close of the recent Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs panel (“U.S. Elections and Brexit: Can Liberalism Survive?”) justified? I wanted to add a short codicil to my remarks at the panel. The liberal world order–and here, in response […]

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Insecurity and the U.S. Election

| August 19, 2016

Is a sense of insecurity the principal driver of the 2016 election in the United States? I wonder whether what we are witnessing reflects a sense “that familiar landmarks denoting American power and prestige are being washed away and the institutions which in previous years safeguarded American strength at home and abroad have been hollowed out or corrupted from within.”






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Managed Pluralism

| August 2, 2016

One of the subtexts of recent and forthcoming elections in Europe and in North America is the extent to which liberal democracies can permit high degrees of diversity—on ethnic, religious, political, linguistic, cultural, “lifestyle” or other grounds—yet retain sufficient cohesion for societal stability and for political institutions based on self-determination to work.






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ESSAYS

Climate Contributions and the Paris Agreement: Fairness and Equity in a Bottom-Up Architecture

| September 15, 2016

Ethical questions of fairness, responsibility, and burden-sharing have always been central to the international politics of climate change and efforts to construct an effective intergovernmental response to this problem.






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Recognition: A Short History

| September 15, 2016

During the past decade there has been a resurgence of interest in the concept of recognition in international theory. Once the narrow concern of social theorists, the concept of recognition is nowadays invoked in at least three different senses in order to explain three different things.






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Swedish Feminist Foreign Policy in the Making: Ethics, Politics, and Gender

In 2015 the world’s first self-defined feminist government was formed in Sweden. As part of that ambitious declaration, Sweden also became the first state ever to publicly adopt a feminist foreign policy, with a stated ambition to become the “strongest voice for gender equality and full employment of human rights for all women and girls.”






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FEATURES

Self-Interest and the Distant Vulnerable

| September 15, 2016

What interests do states have in assisting and protecting vulnerable populations beyond their borders? Today, confronted as we are with civil wars, mass atrocities, and humanitarian catastrophes that have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of civilians and generated the displacement of sixty million more, this question is as urgent as it has ever been.






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Should International Courts Use Public Reason?

| September 15, 2016

Is public reason an appropriate ideal for international courts? Since the early 1990s various political philosophers and legal scholars have argued that supreme courts should “use public reason” or abide by an “ideal of public reason.”






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Rethinking Central Bank Accountability in Uncertain Times

| June 10, 2016

As the dust has settled following the 2008 financial crisis and the economic dislocations that ensued, it has become clear that central banks have gained considerably in authority— using highly unorthodox tools to stimulate the economy, taking a greater role in financial regulation, and putting themselves in more politically sensitive positions.






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BOOK REVIEWS

Realpolitik: A History by John Bew

| September 15, 2016

Realpolitik is back—or if not back, at least enjoying a day in the sun more fully than it has for several decades. Chastened by the “return” of history in the new millennium, politicians, policymakers, and commentators now routinely acknowledge the value of a little more realpolitik in foreign affairs.






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Can Microfinance Work? How to Improve Its Ethical Balance and Effectiveness by Lesley Sherratt

| September 15, 2016

By 2009 the reckless greed of subprime mortgage lenders in the United States had become clear. Housing prices had collapsed by 30 percent or more, and families, unable to keep up with their ballooning mortgage payments, were being forced from their homes.






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Equal Recognition: The Moral Foundations of Minority Rights

| June 10, 2016

Alan Patten’s Equal Recognition is the most significant systematic attempt at deriving a theory of minority rights from the basic tenets of liberalism since Will Kymlicka’s Multicultural Citizenship was published over twenty years ago.






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