CURRENT ISSUE

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Summer 2016 (Issue 30.2)

| June 10, 2016

The second issue in EIA’s 30th anniversary volume includes an essay by John R. Emery on the humanitarian applications of drones; a roundtable on the role of human rights in the UN’s post-2015 development agenda, with contributions by Malcolm Langford, Sandra Fredman, Jaakko Kuosmanen, Meghan Campbell, Kate Donald, and Sally-Anne Way; features by Jacqueline Best on central bank accountability and Cristina Lafont on the importance of the “human” in human rights; an exchange discussing Patti Tamara Lenard’s article on democracies and the power to revoke citizenship (EIA 30.1), with contributions by Elizabeth F. Cohen, Ben Herzog, and David Miller, and with a reply by Patti Tamara Lenard; and book reviews by Jacques E. C. Hymans, Daniel Weinstock, and Ryan Thoreson.






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BLOG

The Stateless and the New UN Secretary-General

| August 22, 2016

2016 marks two critical events: the number of stateless people (refugees and migrants) has reached at all-time high (with some estimates at 65 million), and, alongside the U.S. election, the member-states of the UN will select a new secretary general. One of the candidates for that post, Vuk Jeremic, the former president of the United […]

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Insecurity and the U.S. Election

| August 19, 2016

Is a sense of insecurity the principal driver of the 2016 election in the United States? I wonder whether what we are witnessing reflects a sense “that familiar landmarks denoting American power and prestige are being washed away and the institutions which in previous years safeguarded American strength at home and abroad have been hollowed […]

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Managed Pluralism

| August 2, 2016

One of the subtexts of recent and forthcoming elections in Europe and in North America is the extent to which liberal democracies can permit high degrees of diversity–on ethnic, religious, political, linguistic, cultural, “lifestyle” or other grounds–yet retain sufficient cohesion for societal stability and for political institutions based on self-determination to work. Historically, highly diverse […]

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ROUNDTABLE: HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

Lost in Transformation? The Politics of the Sustainable Development Goals

| June 10, 2016

On September 25, 2015, the world’s leaders adopted a new suite of development goals—the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—that are to guide policymakers for the next decade and a half. On first inspection, the declaration is breathtaking in its scope and ambition.






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Transformative Equality: Making the Sustainable Development Goals Work for Women

It is generally agreed by most observers that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have fallen short of achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment. Today, women continue to be more likely than men to live in poverty, and more than 18 million girls in sub-Saharan Africa are out of school.






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Accountability for the Sustainable Development Goals: A Lost Opportunity?

The question of accountability—or, more precisely, the question of how governments will be held to account for implementing the commitments made in this new agenda—was a critical point of contention throughout the negotiations, resulting in a significant watering down of initial proposals by the end of the process.






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FEATURES

Rethinking Central Bank Accountability in Uncertain Times

| June 10, 2016

As the dust has settled following the 2008 financial crisis and the economic dislocations that ensued, it has become clear that central banks have gained considerably in authority— using highly unorthodox tools to stimulate the economy, taking a greater role in financial regulation, and putting themselves in more politically sensitive positions.






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Should We Take the “Human” Out of Human Rights? Human Dignity in a Corporate World

| June 10, 2016

In recent years philosophical discussions of human rights have focused on the question of whether “humanist” and “political” conceptions of human rights are genuinely incompatible or whether some kind of synthesis between them may be possible.






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Robots and Respect: Assessing the Case Against Autonomous Weapon Systems

| March 10, 2016

There is increasing speculation within military and policy circles that the future of armed conflict is likely to include extensive deployment of autonomous weapon systems. The ethical case for allowing autonomous targeting, at least in specific restricted domains, is stronger than critics have typically acknowledged—but such targeting still remains ethically problematic.






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BOOK REVIEWS

Equal Recognition: The Moral Foundations of Minority Rights

| June 10, 2016

Alan Patten’s Equal Recognition is the most significant systematic attempt at deriving a theory of minority rights from the basic tenets of liberalism since Will Kymlicka’s Multicultural Citizenship was published over twenty years ago.






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Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research

| June 10, 2016

In this important new work, historian Sarah Bridger explores the ambivalent role of scientists in U.S. policy debates over national defense issues from the 1950s to the 1980s. This is a significant contribution to our understanding of the evolution of the scientific professions in the shadow of the national security state.






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Sexualities in World Politics: How LGBTQ Claims Shape International Relations

| June 10, 2016

As states mobilize popular sentiment, diplomatic pressure, and foreign aid over the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) persons, it is no longer tenable to argue that LGBTQ issues are inconsequential in global affairs.






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