RSSBlog

Warren and Haley: Post-Trump Foreign Policies?

| December 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

One of the conclusions of the recently released report Misconnecting with the U.S. Public: Narrative Collapse and U.S. Foreign Policy is the need for U.S. political figures, particularly thinking toward a post-Trump administration, to develop a narrative which acknowledges the recent mistakes that have led to skepticism on the part of the U.S. public towards […]

Read More

Kerch and San Ysidro

| November 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The events in the Kerch Straits, which connect the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, and on the U.S.-Mexico border at the San Ysidro crossing, have several things in common despite occurring in different parts of the world and reflecting different sorts of crises (one, an armed clash between Ukrainian and Russian naval vessels, […]

Read More

The Truth is Not Always as It Seems, and What That Means for Reconciliation and Justice

The Truth is Not Always as It Seems, and What That Means for Reconciliation and Justice

| November 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In this blog post, Caroline Nguyen writes that the difficulty of defining and enforcing the right to truth explains why many scholars and practitioners are skeptical of its efficacy.

Read More

Truth, Justice, and Power: Why Victimization Continues After Conflict

Truth, Justice, and Power: Why Victimization Continues After Conflict

| November 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The cases of South Korea, Spain, and the Gambia show how political institutions can marginalize survivors in the aftermath of conflict.

Read More

Sanders’ “Selective Engagement” versus Transactional Internationalism

| October 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders each offer a different alternative to the traditional “bipartisan consensus” in U.S. foreign policy.

Read More

The Importance of Memory: Unreliable, Precarious, and Crucial to Reconciliation

The Importance of Memory: Unreliable, Precarious, and Crucial to Reconciliation

| October 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Several recent cases involving the Gambia, Japan and Korea, and Spain highlight the tenuous relationship between memory, history, and state-building.

Read More

The Ethics of the “Doorstep”

| September 2018
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Asha Castleberry raised a great point in her discussion with Ali Wyne (the panel on “Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again“) at the Carnegie Council: connecting the broad swath of national security matters to the “doorstep” (a formulation that participant Simran Maker amplified) of the American voter. In other words, the “doorstep test” requires the policymaker […]

Read More