RSSThe Ethics of War and Peace

Robots and Respect: A Response to Robert Sparrow

| September 15, 2016
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Robert Sparrow recently argued in this journal that several initially plausible arguments in favor of the deployment of autonomous weapon systems (AWS) in warfare are in fact flawed, and that the deployment of AWS faces a serious moral objection.

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Self-Interest and the Distant Vulnerable

| September 15, 2016
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What interests do states have in assisting and protecting vulnerable populations beyond their borders? Today, confronted as we are with civil wars, mass atrocities, and humanitarian catastrophes that have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of civilians and generated the displacement of sixty million more, this question is as urgent as it has ever been.






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<i>EIA</i> Interview with Robert Sparrow on Autonomous Weapon Systems and Respect in Warfare

EIA Interview with Robert Sparrow on Autonomous Weapon Systems and Respect in Warfare

| August 16, 2016
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In this interview, Professor Robert Sparrow of Monash University speaks to the journal about his work on ethical issues raised by new technologies. The conversation focuses on Autonomous Weapons Systems (AWS), often referred to as “killer robots.”






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Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research

Scientists at War: The Ethics of Cold War Weapons Research

| June 10, 2016
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In this important new work, historian Sarah Bridger explores the ambivalent role of scientists in U.S. policy debates over national defense issues from the 1950s to the 1980s. This is a significant contribution to our understanding of the evolution of the scientific professions in the shadow of the national security state.






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The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Humanitarian Drones

The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Humanitarian Drones

| June 10, 2016
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What comes to mind when we hear the word “drone”? For many of us, it is the image of a General Atomics MQ-1B Predator drone launching a Hellfire missile at a suspected militant target. But is this picture beginning to change? Should this picture change?






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Jus ad Vim: A Rejoinder to Helen Frowe

| March 10, 2016
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Frowe argues from the revisionist just war position, accepting that this is the correct interpretation of just war principles. This view misses something important about the realities of war and is simply too impractical to be applicable to the entire continuum of violence in the international realm.






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On the Redundancy of Jus ad Vim: A Response to Daniel Brunstetter and Megan Braun

| March 10, 2016
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The set of principles proposed by Brunstetter and Braun to comprise jus ad vim is redundant, and the project stems from a largely implausible understanding of the principles of jus ad bellum.






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Robots and Respect: Assessing the Case Against Autonomous Weapon Systems

| March 10, 2016
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There is increasing speculation within military and policy circles that the future of armed conflict is likely to include extensive deployment of autonomous weapon systems. The ethical case for allowing autonomous targeting, at least in specific restricted domains, is stronger than critics have typically acknowledged—but such targeting still remains ethically problematic.






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