RSSThe Ethics of War and Peace

Pro Mundo Mori? The Problem of Cosmopolitan Motivation in War

| June 9, 2017
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In this feature article, Lior Erez explores the problem of motivating soldiers to fight in cosmopolitan wars. First, he argues that the problem is best framed as a political one rather than an ethical or meta-ethical one. Then, he goes on to suggest how states might close the gap between cosmopolitan demands and soldiers’ motivations, evaluating a range of options.

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Introduction: Legitimate Authority, War, and the Ethics of Rebellion

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The three articles in this special section all investigate the idea that considerations of “legitimate authority” have a key role in constituting the modern idea of war and in determining the normative status of those who participate in it.






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Legitimate Authority and the Ethics of War: A Map of the Terrain

| June 9, 2017
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In this article, Jonathan Parry challenges both the traditional conception of the legitimate authority criterion as well as those reductivists who reject it wholesale. Specifically, he offers a qualified defense of the authority requirement on reductivists’ own terms.






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Does Who Matter? Legal Authority and the Use of Military Violence

| June 9, 2017
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In this article, Pål Wrange demonstrates that in international law there is no consistent, over-arching conception of proper authority. Instead, he concludes, there exists authority to do different things for different purposes, allocated to a variety of actors who base their authority on a multitude of characteristics.






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The Perspective of the Rebel: A Gap in the Global Normative Architecture

| June 9, 2017
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In this article, Christopher Finlay writes that the failure to take account of what he calls the “Rebel Perspective” constitutes a source of instability within the global normative architecture governing the use of force. Because this architecture is nevertheless valuable, he proposes some suggestions for strengthening it by incorporating the Rebel Perspective.






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Shifting International Security Norms

Shifting International Security Norms

| June 9, 2017
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In this review essay, Denise Garcia draws on two recent books to argue that new technology can reinforce security norms just as easily as it can undermine them. Additionally, she shows that contestation is a natural part of the process by which norms are reformed or replaced, and that this leads to ethical progress over the long term.






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<i>Preventive Force: Drones, Targeted Killing, and the Transformation of Contemporary Warfare</i>, Kerstin Fisk and Jennifer M. Ramos, eds.

Preventive Force: Drones, Targeted Killing, and the Transformation of Contemporary Warfare, Kerstin Fisk and Jennifer M. Ramos, eds.

| June 9, 2017
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This collection of eleven original articles presents a wide variety of perspectives on what the moral and legal framework for preventive use of force by drones should look like. The most important chapter, however, thoughtfully questions the entire premise of using preventive force to combat terrorism.






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Tomahawk Foreign Policy: Trump and The Use of Force Short of War

Tomahawk Foreign Policy: Trump and The Use of Force Short of War

| April 11, 2017
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What can just war thinking and the use of force short of war tell us about Trump’s strike against Syria?






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