Tag: Trump

American Engagement: When It Comes to Foreign Policy, Does America Deserve Trump?

| February 2018

In a recent op-ed, two former American Foreign Service officers made a very compelling argument in support of greater American engagement globally and renewed U.S. democracy support abroad. Amb. Adrian Basora and Amb. Ken Yalowitz argue that the current global authoritarian offensive is a U.S. national security threat and conclude that “business and economic thought […]

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America’s Selective Burden Shedding?

| December 2017

At the December meeting of the Loisach Group, I was intrigued by the description of where U.S. foreign policy seems to be headed under the Trump administration offered by my colleague Daniel Hamilton–“selective burden shedding.” This term is a riff off the the more standard proclamation that the United States seeks its partners and allies […]

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The Implications of “The World is Not a Global Community”

| May 2017

“The world is not a ‘global community.’” Last year, in attempting to discern the ethical and philosophical bases of candidate Donald Trump’s approach to world affairs, the first point I made was this: “There is no such thing as an international community. The “buck” stops with the nation-state and the nation-state decides what commitments it […]

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Pacta Sunt Servanda, Treaties, and the U.S. Election

| June 2016

How would each presidential candidate approach what is one of the bedrock ethical principles of how the United States conducts foreign policy: pacta sunt servanda, or the absolute ethical requirement that treaties, agreements and commitments must be upheld.

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Trans-Pacific Partnership and Trump

| May 2016

Listening to Marketplace’s discussion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, two things jumped out at me: the first is the assessment that, after all the heavy lifting creating this massive free-trade arrangement will require, the net benefits are quite modest.

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