Tag: NATO

The Montenegro Test

| July 2018

The discussion over Montenegro has ethical dimensions that have been largely overlooked.

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A “Values-Free” Trans-Atlantic Relationship?

| June 2018

A shift to more transactional modes of doing business–a “values-free” approach–is a risky way to sustain support for existing trans-Atlantic policies and institutions.

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The Implications of “The World is Not a Global Community”

| May 2017

“The world is not a ‘global community.’” Last year, in attempting to discern the ethical and philosophical bases of candidate Donald Trump’s approach to world affairs, the first point I made was this: “There is no such thing as an international community. The “buck” stops with the nation-state and the nation-state decides what commitments it […]

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Pacta Sunt Servanda, Treaties, and the U.S. Election

| June 2016

How would each presidential candidate approach what is one of the bedrock ethical principles of how the United States conducts foreign policy: pacta sunt servanda, or the absolute ethical requirement that treaties, agreements and commitments must be upheld.

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Trans-Pacific Partnership and Trump

| May 2016

Listening to Marketplace’s discussion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, two things jumped out at me: the first is the assessment that, after all the heavy lifting creating this massive free-trade arrangement will require, the net benefits are quite modest.

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