Tag: featured

First Georgia, Then Ukraine: How Russian Propaganda Justifies Invasions

First Georgia, Then Ukraine: How Russian Propaganda Justifies Invasions

The morning that Russia invaded Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared on Russian television outlining his rationale for war. While concern for what was about to befall Ukrainians and Ukraine dominated many peoples’ minds, politicians and scholars alike were left scratching their heads at Putin’s stated justifications.

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Ukraine: An Ethical Response

Ukraine: An Ethical Response

| March 8, 2022

With the invasion of Ukraine in 2022, Russian president Vladimir Putin resumed his use of force against Ukraine that began with the seizure of Crimea in 2014. As we examine the question of ethical policy responses to the invasion, we must first address Russia’s justifications for acting.

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Ethical Fandom in an Era of State-Owned Teams: The Case of Newcastle United

Ethical Fandom in an Era of State-Owned Teams: The Case of Newcastle United

| January 28, 2022

Many sports teams are owned by individuals and companies that engage in legally and morally dubious activities. For players and for fans, it is important to look at the source of the riches that are funding the world’s most beautiful, ubiquitous, and profitable game, as well as the motivations of the owners of these clubs.

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EIA Winter 2021 Issue–Out Now!

EIA Winter 2021 Issue–Out Now!

| December 16, 2021

The editors of Ethics & International Affairs are pleased to present the Winter 2021 issue of the journal! The issue looks at the territorial states-system, the ethics of vaccine nationalism, refugee policy, and much more. Access the table of contents here.

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Helping Refugees Where They Are

Helping Refugees Where They Are

| December 16, 2021

Some policies are not politically feasible. In the context of refugees, many claim it is not politically feasible to start admitting significantly more refugees into wealthy countries. This review essay argues that there are good reasons to suppose increasing refugees’ admissions to wealthy states is politically feasible, if we account for the ways citizens in wealthy states are harmed when refugees are not admitted, and for the ways citizens are harmed when immigration enforcement prevents refugees from arriving.

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Secretary-General selection process and the P5 stranglehold on power

Secretary-General selection process and the P5 stranglehold on power

| December 9, 2021

On September 10, 2021, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 75-325. Behind the resolution, which concerns the selection process for the Secretary-General, were two months of intense negotiations between the Security Council (read: the five permanent members) and the General Assembly (read: the other 188 states). In particular, the hotly contested paragraph on a female Secretary-General shows that when push comes to shove, the P5 will choose power over gender equality.

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Is a Bad Deal Better than no Deal?: A Perspective from Africa on the G7’s Agreement to Restructure International Corporate Taxation

Is a Bad Deal Better than no Deal?: A Perspective from Africa on the G7’s Agreement to Restructure International Corporate Taxation

| November 22, 2021

On June 5, 2021, the G7 finance ministers reached a landmark agreement to restructure the global system of corporate taxation. While this has been widely hailed as a breakthrough toward a more equitable way of taxing the digital economy and a triumph of multilateralism in the first year of the post-Trump era, the truth is much more complicated than it seems, particularly for countries in Africa and the Global South.

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On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework

On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework

| November 1, 2021

What are the ethical limits to vaccine nationalism? In this article, Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel and coauthors propose the fair priority for residents (FPR) framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public health interventions.

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