RSSIssue 32.4

Winter 2018 (Issue 32.4)

Winter 2018 (Issue 32.4)

| December 2018
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The editors of Ethics & International Affairs are pleased to present the Winter 2018 issue of the journal! The centerpiece of this issue is a roundtable organized by Duncan B. Hollis and Tim Maurer on competing normative visions for cyberspace, with contributions from Ronald J. Deibert, Daniel J. Weitzner, Duncan B. Hollis and Jens David Ohlin, and Martha Finnemore. Additionally, the issue contains an essay by S. Ilgu Ozler taking stock of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the seventieth anniversary of its adoption; a feature by Bolarinwa Adediran assessing proposals to restrain the use of the veto at the UN Security Council; review essays by Anne Peters on international law and Micheline Ishay on human rights; and book reviews by Richard Beardsworth, Rory Cox, Christopher J. Finlay, Avery Kolers, and Michael Skerker.

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at Seventy: Progress and Challenges

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at Seventy: Progress and Challenges

| December 2018
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In this essay, Ş. İlgü Özler examines global progress toward achieving the ideals enshrined in the UDHR, which was adopted seventy years ago in 1948.

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Introduction: Competing Visions for Cyberspace

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This roundtable explores what the governance of cyberspace might look like if it were geared toward just one primary purpose, such as to advance human rights, to promote economic prosperity, or to facilitate war.

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Toward a Human-Centric Approach to Cybersecurity

| December 2018
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This essay presents an approach to cybersecurity that is derived from the tradition of “human security.” This approach prioritizes the individual and views the Internet as part of the essential foundation for the modern exercise of human rights.

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Promoting Economic Prosperity in Cyberspace

| December 2018
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This essay argues that the original policy foundations on which the Internet was built—including strong free speech protections, open technical standards, and privacy protection—are crucial for ensuring that it continues to be an engine for economic innovation, though some of these will require adjustment.

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What if Cyberspace Were for Fighting?

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This essay explores the ethical and legal implications of prioritizing cyberspace as a warfighting domain. The authors envision a world where states take on a greater role in governance but remain constrained by international law as well as by the norms of sovereignty, nonintervention, and self-determination.

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Ethical Dilemmas in Cyberspace

| December 2018
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This final roundtable essay steps back to highlight three broad issues that cut across the other contributions and raise ethical concerns about our activity online. These are the commodification of people, vast and growing inequalities, and the tension between human security and state security.

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Reforming the Security Council through a Code of Conduct: A Sisyphean Task?

| December 2018
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In this feature, Bolarinwa Adediran disputes the utility of a code of conduct to regulate the exercise of the veto at the UN Security Council during humanitarian crises, arguing that such a code would not make any significant difference to the way mass atrocity crimes are addressed.

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