RSSIssue 32.1

Spring 2018 (Issue 32.1)

Spring 2018 (Issue 32.1)

| March 2018
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We are pleased to present a Special Issue of Ethics & International Affairs! The heart of this Special Issue is a roundtable on the theme of “Rising Powers and the International Order,” with contributions from G. John Ikenberry, Shiping Tang, Anne L. Clunan, Deepa M. Ollapally, Ole Wæver, and Andrew Hurrell. Each essay in the collection examines the future of the global order from the perspective of one or more major rising powers, as well as the EU and the United States. The issue also contains an essay on golden visas and the marketization of citizenship by Ayelet Shachar; a review essay on eliminating corruption by Gillian Brock; and book reviews from Kevin Macnish, Colleen Murphy, Brigit Toebes, and Steven Vanderheiden.

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The Marketization of Citizenship in an Age of Restrictionism

The Marketization of Citizenship in an Age of Restrictionism

| March 2018
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This essay traces the rise of golden visa programs and critically evaluates the legal, normative, and distributional quandaries they raise. Shachar writes that the intrusion of market logic into the sovereign act of defining “who belongs” raises significant justice and equality concerns that require closer scrutiny.

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Introduction: Rising Powers and the International Order

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This roundtable brings together distinguished international scholars to reflect on grand power transition, focusing on the ways that rising states may be shaping and reshaping global order.

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Why the Liberal World Order Will Survive

| March 2018
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This essay offers an evolutionary perspective of international order and argues that although America’s hegemonic position may be declining, the liberal international characteristics of order—openness, rules, and multilateralism—are deeply rooted and likely to persist.

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China and the Future International Order(s)

| March 2018
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China sees no need for, and hence does not seek, fundamental transformation of the existing order. Rather, it seeks piecemeal modification.

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Russia and the Liberal World Order

| March 2018
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The question of Russia’s desire to change a liberal international order hangs on the type of liberalism embedded in that order. Moreover, despite some calls from within to create a new, post-liberal order premised on conservative nationalism and geopolitics, Russia is unlikely to fare well in such a world.

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India and the International Order: Accommodation and Adjustment

| March 2018
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India’s deep-seated anti-colonial nationalism and commitment to strategic autonomy continue to form the core of Indian identity. This, in turn, informs India’s partial and instrumental commitment to Western-dominated multilateral institutions and Western norms.

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A Post-Western Europe: Strange Identities in a Less Liberal World Order

| March 2018
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Europe’s curious position—neither declining hegemon nor rising power—brings to light some intriguing dynamics of the international order. This essay traces the threats and opportunities to Europe presented by the emerging order in four domains: overall power, economics, values, and institutions.

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