RSSIssue 31.3

<i>EIA</i> Fall 2017 issue—Out Now!

EIA Fall 2017 issue—Out Now!

| September 8, 2017
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We are pleased to announce the publication of the Fall 2017 issue of Ethics & International Affairs. Access the issue here.

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Fall 2017 (Issue 31.3)

Fall 2017 (Issue 31.3)

| September 8, 2017
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We are pleased to announce the publication of the Fall 2017 issue of Ethics & International Affairs! This issue contains essays by Amartya Sen on the foundations of global justice and Amitav Acharya on the multiplex world order; features by Jamie Gaskarth on rising powers and their conceptions of responsibility, Laura Hartman on the “playing God” critique of climate engineering, and Aidan Hehir on improving the responsibility to protect through legal reform; review essays by Chris Brown on global poverty and James Turner Johnson on the ethics of insurgency; and book reviews by Claire Finkelstein, João Nunes, Cheryl O’Brien, and Michael Zürn.

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Ethics and the Foundation of Global Justice

Ethics and the Foundation of Global Justice

| September 8, 2017
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Can the idea of justice be global in scope? In this essay, Amartya Sen challenges the dominant theories of justice in contemporary political philosophy, asserting that the pursuit of justice does not depend on the existence of a sovereign state.

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After Liberal Hegemony: The Advent of a Multiplex World Order

After Liberal Hegemony: The Advent of a Multiplex World Order

| September 8, 2017
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In this essay, Amitav Acharya argues that as the U.S.-dominated world order comes to an end, liberal values and institutions will not disappear, but will have to coexist and enmesh with the ideas and institutions of the rising powers. This “multiplex world” carries both risks and opportunities for managing international stability.

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Rising Powers, Responsibility, and International Society

| September 8, 2017
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This article examines statements made by rising powers Brazil, China, and India in UN Security Council meetings between 2011 and 2016 to identify their perspectives on which international actors are responsible and what constitutes responsible action. Gaskarth then analyzes these statements in light of English School theory on responsibility and international society.

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Climate Engineering and the Playing God Critique

| September 8, 2017
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The “playing God” critique charges that humans should not undertake to control nature in ways that overstep the proper scope of human agency. In this article, Laura M. Hartman explores the way this critique is used with respect to geoengineering, and concludes that climate interventions should be based on contextual awareness and responsive, communal responsibility.

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“Utopian in the Right Sense”: The Responsibility to Protect and the Logical Necessity of Reform

| September 8, 2017
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In this article, Aidan Hehir writes that claims made about the success of the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) echo the pejorative conceptions of “utopianism” as advanced by E. H. Carr and Ken Booth. In order to revive RtoP, Hehir suggests a potential reform of the existing international legal order that meets Carr’s preference for normative thinking that is “utopian in the right sense.”

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Poverty Alleviation, Global Justice, and the Real World

Poverty Alleviation, Global Justice, and the Real World

| September 8, 2017
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For nearly half a century, political theorists have wrestled with the problem of global social justice, producing ever more elaborate and analytically-sophisticated models, but without engaging significantly with, or materially influencing, real-world politics. In this review essay, Chris Brown considers one of the latest contributions to this literature.

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