RSSIssue 26.3

Limiting the Killing in War: Military Necessity and the St. Petersburg Assumption

| September 13, 2012
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In this article, we explain why an ideal typical war cannot be regulated with rules that attach to individuals’ moral status; propose an alternative framework for regulating the conduct of hostilities that hinges on military necessity; and argue that its deliberate departure from individual rights–based morality is morally preferable.

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International Rescue and Mediated Consequences

| September 13, 2012
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It is generally assumed that when judging the proportionality of a humanitarian intervention, these consequences must be factored into the equation. If an intervention is expected to provoke adverse reactions the accumulated costs of which will outweigh the benefits that the intervention will deliver, then the intervention is thought to be disproportional and, therefore, unjustified. I want to challenge this assumption.

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Two Cheers for Humanitarianism

| September 13, 2012
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The unsettled boundaries of what properly constitutes humanitarianism brings a number of difficult questions to the surface.

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