RSSInternational Law and Human Rights

Rising Powers, Responsibility, and International Society

| September 8, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

This article examines statements made by rising powers Brazil, China, and India in UN Security Council meetings between 2011 and 2016 to identify their perspectives on which international actors are responsible and what constitutes responsible action. Gaskarth then analyzes these statements in light of English School theory on responsibility and international society.

Read More

“Utopian in the Right Sense”: The Responsibility to Protect and the Logical Necessity of Reform

| September 8, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In this article, Aidan Hehir writes that claims made about the success of the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) echo the pejorative conceptions of “utopianism” as advanced by E. H. Carr and Ken Booth. In order to revive RtoP, Hehir suggests a potential reform of the existing international legal order that meets Carr’s preference for normative thinking that is “utopian in the right sense.”

Read More

<i>Lawfare: Law as a Weapon of War</i> by Orde Kittrie

Lawfare: Law as a Weapon of War by Orde Kittrie

| September 8, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Orde Kittrie’s impressive new book describes the various uses of law to accomplish military aims in international affairs. It offers a systematic, detailed, and visionary synthesis and should be required reading for any military strategist or scholar of armed conflict.

Read More

Historic Wins for Democracy and Rights in El Salvador

Historic Wins for Democracy and Rights in El Salvador

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Recently there have been two giant wins for democracy, human rights, and the environment in an unlikely spot: the small, embattled nation of El Salvador. What lessons can be learned, and can nations and activists build on these two victories?

Read More

Securing Protection for De Facto Refugees: The Case of Central America’s Northern Triangle

| June 9, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Northern Triangle of Central America is one of the most violent regions of the world. However, those fleeing the violence are unable to find adequate protection either within their own countries, in the broader region, or internationally. This essay calls for updating the definition of the term “refugee” under international law, as well as greater domestic recognition of the violence.

Read More

Rebirth of Universal Jurisdiction?

| May 4, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

A recent NGO report documented a 30 percent rise in universal jurisdiction cases worldwide just when it seemed like the principle was on the decline. What’s driving this resurgence and what are the implications?

Read More

A Conversation on Statelessness with Kristy Belton

A Conversation on Statelessness with Kristy Belton

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In this interview, Kristy A. Belton talks about statelessness–which affects more than ten million people worldwide–including why it persists and how we can end it. Belton’s most recent essay on statelessness appears in the Spring 2017 issue of Ethics & International Affairs.

Read More

Human Rights, Global Ethics, and the Ordinary Virtues

| March 10, 2017
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Drawing on research from site-visits to eight countries, this essay explores whether human rights has become a global ethic, and, if so, how the concept of human rights influences or structures private moral decision-making.

Read More