RSSEssay

Human Rights, Global Ethics, and the Ordinary Virtues

| March 10, 2017
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Drawing on research from site-visits to eight countries, this essay explores whether human rights has become a global ethic, and, if so, how the concept of human rights influences or structures private moral decision-making.

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Heeding the Clarion Call in the Americas: The Quest to End Statelessness

| March 10, 2017
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In 2014, the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees launched the #IBelong Campaign to eradicate statelessness by 2024. Given that UN Secretary-General António Guterres and others have identified the Americas as having the potential to be the first region to end statelessness, this essay evaluates the region’s progress towards that goal.






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Rethinking the Concept of a “Durable Solution”: Sahrawi Refugee Camps Four Decades On

Rethinking the Concept of a “Durable Solution”: Sahrawi Refugee Camps Four Decades On

| March 10, 2017
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The Sahrawi people have been housed in refugee camps in Tindouf, Algeria since 1975. This essay uses the case of the Sahrawi to illustrate the problematic nature of refugee camps, which are intended to serve a transitional purpose but ultimately become de facto long-term solutions, depriving refugees of their political and social rights indefinitely.






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Ending Statelessness Through Belonging: A Transformative Agenda?

| December 14, 2016
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The subject of belonging conjures up a realm of emotions. This essay explores statelessness through the prism of belonging, asking whether the United Nations Refugee Agency’s reframing of statelessness as an issue of belonging can be successful in eradicating statelessness globally.






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Climate Contributions and the Paris Agreement: Fairness and Equity in a Bottom-Up Architecture

| September 15, 2016
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Ethical questions of fairness, responsibility, and burden-sharing have always been central to the international politics of climate change and efforts to construct an effective intergovernmental response to this problem.






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Recognition: A Short History

| September 15, 2016
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During the past decade there has been a resurgence of interest in the concept of recognition in international theory. Once the narrow concern of social theorists, the concept of recognition is nowadays invoked in at least three different senses in order to explain three different things.






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Swedish Feminist Foreign Policy in the Making: Ethics, Politics, and Gender

Swedish Feminist Foreign Policy in the Making: Ethics, Politics, and Gender

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In 2014 the world’s first self-defined feminist government was formed in Sweden. As part of that ambitious declaration, Sweden also became the first state ever to publicly adopt a feminist foreign policy, with a stated ambition to become the “strongest voice for gender equality and full employment of human rights for all women and girls.”






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The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Humanitarian Drones

The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Humanitarian Drones

| June 10, 2016
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What comes to mind when we hear the word “drone”? For many of us, it is the image of a General Atomics MQ-1B Predator drone launching a Hellfire missile at a suspected militant target. But is this picture beginning to change? Should this picture change?






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