RSSBook Review

A Magna Carta for Children? Rethinking Children’s Rights

A Magna Carta for Children? Rethinking Children’s Rights

| December 16, 2021
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Children’s rights present a unique challenge. On the one hand, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history, with every country having ratified it except the United States. On the other hand, more than thirty years after the CRC was adopted, children’s rights continue to make many adults, from policymakers to parents, uneasy.

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New Pandemics, Old Politics: Two Hundred Years of War on Disease and Its Alternatives

New Pandemics, Old Politics: Two Hundred Years of War on Disease and Its Alternatives

| December 16, 2021
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Written for a general audience, Alex de Waal’s New Pandemics, Old Politics explores why in the twenty-first century responses to infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics continue to be guided by an outdated script.

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Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities

Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities

| December 16, 2021
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The constitution of political community in the aftermath of colonialism was the foremost challenge for postcolonial leaders who had been shaped by anti-colonial struggles premised on the modern notion of political self-determination.

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War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War

War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War

| October 20, 2021
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Since the 1970s, when the Vietnam War sparked massive opposition across the United States, philosophers and other academics have written a great deal about the theory of war. At the same time, there has been a parallel flourishing of writing on contractarianism in philosophy and political theory. But there has been no systematic or sustained work that combines both areas of inquiry—a contractarian treatment of the laws of war—until now.

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On Obedience: Contrasting Philosophies for the Military, Citizenry, and Community

On Obedience: Contrasting Philosophies for the Military, Citizenry, and Community

| August 12, 2021
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Pauline Shanks Kaurin has written an important, engaging, and timely book on obedience. As her book’s subtitle suggests, it is a work of military ethics that is also concerned with civil matters.

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The Laws of War in International Thought

The Laws of War in International Thought

| August 12, 2021
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Essential reading for any scholar interested in the laws and ethics of war, The Laws of War in International Thought reopens the questions pertaining to the relation between the laws of war and the just war tradition

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No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis

No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis

| August 12, 2021
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In No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis, Serena Parekh masterfully accomplishes a goal that often eludes many publicly engaged philosophers: to advance an insightful, original argument on an important moral issue that is both accessible to a general audience and illuminating to theorists who are deeply immersed in the relevant academic debates.

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The Consequences of National Humiliation

The Consequences of National Humiliation

| May 7, 2021
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If a humiliated tree falls in a forest, but our methodological tools do not allow us to perceive or verify it, what of the tree? Does it exist? Can we study it? Should we care?

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