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Secretary-General selection process and the P5 stranglehold on power

Secretary-General selection process and the P5 stranglehold on power

| December 2021

On September 10, 2021, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 75-325. Behind the resolution, which concerns the selection process for the Secretary-General, were two months of intense negotiations between the Security Council (read: the five permanent members) and the General Assembly (read: the other 188 states). In particular, the hotly contested paragraph on a female Secretary-General shows that when push comes to shove, the P5 will choose power over gender equality.

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Is a Bad Deal Better than no Deal?: A Perspective from Africa on the G7’s Agreement to Restructure International Corporate Taxation

Is a Bad Deal Better than no Deal?: A Perspective from Africa on the G7’s Agreement to Restructure International Corporate Taxation

| November 2021

On June 5, 2021, the G7 finance ministers reached a landmark agreement to restructure the global system of corporate taxation. While this has been widely hailed as a breakthrough toward a more equitable way of taxing the digital economy and a triumph of multilateralism in the first year of the post-Trump era, the truth is much more complicated than it seems, particularly for countries in Africa and the Global South.

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EIA Spring 2022 Remote Editorial Internship

EIA Spring 2022 Remote Editorial Internship

| November 2021

Ethics & International Affairs, the journal of the Carnegie Council, seeks a remote volunteer intern for the spring semester.

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Revisiting the Historical Memory and Significance of the Berlin Wall

Revisiting the Historical Memory and Significance of the Berlin Wall

| November 2021

This week marks the thirty-second anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The occasion is a moment to reflect on the human cost endured as a result of the wall, both in its existence and the efforts to resist it. Revisiting the historical memory of the wall’s effects on Berliners is not only useful in shaping our understanding of the past but also in shaping better policies around migration and immigration today.

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On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework

On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework

What are the ethical limits to vaccine nationalism? In this article, Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel and coauthors propose the fair priority for residents (FPR) framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public health interventions.

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EIA Fall 2021 Issue–Out Now!

EIA Fall 2021 Issue–Out Now!

| October 2021

The editors of Ethics & International Affairs are pleased to present the Fall 2021 issue of the journal! The issue looks at the true cost of maintaining a standing military, ethical AI and gender equality, the reduced legal equality of combatants in war, the global politics of health security, and much more. Access the table of contents here.

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War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War

War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War

| October 2021

Since the 1970s, when the Vietnam War sparked massive opposition across the United States, philosophers and other academics have written a great deal about the theory of war. At the same time, there has been a parallel flourishing of writing on contractarianism in philosophy and political theory. But there has been no systematic or sustained work that combines both areas of inquiry—a contractarian treatment of the laws of war—until now.

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Engines of Patriarchy: Ethical Artificial Intelligence in Times of Illiberal Backlash Politics

Engines of Patriarchy: Ethical Artificial Intelligence in Times of Illiberal Backlash Politics

In recent years, concerns over the risks posed by artificial intelligence (AI) have mounted. In response, international organizations (IOs) have begun to translate the emerging consensus on the need for ethical AI into concrete international rules and standards. While the path toward effective AI governance faces many challenges, this essay shifts attention to an obstacle that has received little attention so far: the growing illiberal backlash in IOs.

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