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<i>EIA</i> Interview on Crime and Global Justice with Daniele Archibugi

EIA Interview on Crime and Global Justice with Daniele Archibugi

Adam Read-Brown talks with Daniele Archibugi about selectivity, “winners justice,” and the perceived legitimacy international criminal tribunals.

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<i>EIA</i> Spring 2018 Issue–Out Now

EIA Spring 2018 Issue–Out Now

| April 18, 2018

We are pleased to announce the publication of the Spring 2018 issue of Ethics & International Affairs. Access the Special Issue here.

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Migration, Brain Drain, and Cuba-U.S. Relations

Migration, Brain Drain, and Cuba-U.S. Relations

| April 18, 2018

The Cuba-U.S. relationship shows that advocating open borders is not as ethically straightforward as one may think, and that sometimes open door policies have nefarious purposes. This adds an often-overlooked dimension to the debate on the ethics of migration.

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Spring 2018 (Issue 32.1)

Spring 2018 (Issue 32.1)

| March 9, 2018

We are pleased to present a Special Issue of Ethics & International Affairs! The heart of this Special Issue is a roundtable on the theme of “Rising Powers and the International Order,” with contributions from G. John Ikenberry, Shiping Tang, Anne L. Clunan, Deepa M. Ollapally, Ole Wæver, and Andrew Hurrell. Each essay in the collection examines the future of the global order from the perspective of one or more major rising powers, as well as the EU and the United States. The issue also contains an essay on golden visas and the marketization of citizenship by Ayelet Shachar; a review essay on eliminating corruption by Gillian Brock; and book reviews from Kevin Macnish, Colleen Murphy, Brigit Toebes, and Steven Vanderheiden.

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The Marketization of Citizenship in an Age of Restrictionism

The Marketization of Citizenship in an Age of Restrictionism

| March 9, 2018

This essay traces the rise of golden visa programs and critically evaluates the legal, normative, and distributional quandaries they raise. Shachar writes that the intrusion of market logic into the sovereign act of defining “who belongs” raises significant justice and equality concerns that require closer scrutiny.

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Introduction: Rising Powers and the International Order

This roundtable brings together distinguished international scholars to reflect on grand power transition, focusing on the ways that rising states may be shaping and reshaping global order.

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Why the Liberal World Order Will Survive

| March 9, 2018

This essay offers an evolutionary perspective of international order and argues that although America’s hegemonic position may be declining, the liberal international characteristics of order—openness, rules, and multilateralism—are deeply rooted and likely to persist.

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China and the Future International Order(s)

| March 9, 2018

China sees no need for, and hence does not seek, fundamental transformation of the existing order. Rather, it seeks piecemeal modification.

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