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Can the EU Ethically Wean off Russian Gas?

Can the EU Ethically Wean off Russian Gas?

| November 29, 2022

In response to Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine at the end of February 2022, the European Union, the United States, the United Kingdom, and several other countries put together wide-ranging economic sanctions against Russia. One of the goals was to cut down on, and eventually eliminate, oil and gas imports from Russia. Though this was hailed by many as an opportunity for both increasing security and transitioning to green energy, some countries in the EU continue to have a more difficult time weaning off Russian gas than others.

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The Women-Led Uprising and Iran’s Islamic Republic

The Women-Led Uprising and Iran’s Islamic Republic

| November 22, 2022

The nationwide Iranian uprising in reaction to the death of a young woman—Mahsa (Jina) Amini—while in police custody for violating the Islamic dress code has been called a women-led revolution, unprecedented not only in Iran but across the world. How should we think about these protests in historical context and what do they mean for the future of the republic?

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What We’ve Been Reading

What We’ve Been Reading

| November 7, 2022

Welcome to our roundup of news and current events related to ethics and international affairs! Here’s some of what we’ve been reading this past month.

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Saving the International Justice Regime: Beyond Backlash against International Courts

Saving the International Justice Regime: Beyond Backlash against International Courts

| October 11, 2022

In Saving the International Justice Regime: Beyond Backlash against International Courts, Courtney Hillebrecht provides answers to important questions related to the backlash politics of international justice: What is backlash and what forms does it take, and why do states and elites engage in backlash against international human rights and courts?

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The Origins of Overthrow: How Emotional Frustration Shapes US Regime Change Interventions

The Origins of Overthrow: How Emotional Frustration Shapes US Regime Change Interventions

| October 11, 2022

Payam Ghalehdar’s fascinating book The Origins of Overthrow: How Emotional Frustration Shapes US Regime Change Interventions addresses an important puzzle: Why do states often pay exorbitant costs to pursue regime change when it so rarely achieves their objectives?

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International Development Cooperation Today: A Radical Shift towards a Global Paradigm

International Development Cooperation Today: A Radical Shift towards a Global Paradigm

| October 11, 2022

The literature on international development cooperation tends to be dominated by scholars and policymakers based at Anglo-American universities and research institutes. It is therefore refreshing to encounter perspectives from outside of this somewhat insular bubble. A recently published compendium by Patrick Develtere, Huib Huyse, and Jan Van Ongevalle is a case in point.

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Fall 2022 (36.3)

Fall 2022 (36.3)

| October 11, 2022

The editors of Ethics & International Affairs are pleased to present the Fall 2022 issue of the journal! The highlight of this issue is a book symposium organized by Ana Tanasoca and John S. Dryzek on Democratizing Global Justice, featuring contributions by Terry Macdonald and Kate MacDonald, Eva Erman, and Ana Tanasoca and John S. Dryzek. Additionally, the issue includes a feature article by Felix Bender on political refugeehood, and an essay by Jonathan Becker on the global liberal arts challenge. The issue also contains a review essay by James Pattison on Ukraine, intervention and the post-liberal world order, and book reviews by Joslyn Barnhart, Oumar Ba, and Daniel E. Esser.

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Introduction: Democratizing Global Justice

| October 11, 2022

Global governance ought to uphold global justice, a purpose that various institutions and instruments of global governance acknowledge more or less explicitly. Yet, to be effectively implemented, ethical principles of justice must first be “translated” into concrete policy. This formative and interpretive exercise—of determining what justice means and practically requires—leaves a lot of discretion to those making the interpretations, thereby raising important ethical dilemmas.

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