Nikolas Gvosdev

Nikolas Gvosdev is a professor of national security studies at the U.S. Naval War College, and serves as Senior Fellow, U.S. Global Engagement Program.

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Nikolas Gvosdev's Latest Posts

Ethical Considerations in a Trade War with China

| August 2019

Are there ethical considerations that need to be factored in as part of assessing the merits of a “trade war” with the People’s Republic of China? There are three broad ethical frameworks that are in conflict which make answering this question difficult. The ethics of a trade war depend, in large part, upon which set […]

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Democratic Candidates and Foreign Policy

| July 2019

Foreign Policy has released a compendium of statements and positions taken by the candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for president with regards to different issues with foreign policy. This allows interested voters the chance to see where each of the candidates falls out along the spectrum. How nationalist versus internationalist? Which narrative most applies–restorationist, democratic […]

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The Anti-Narrative

| June 2019

In the last several posts, we have been discussing various narratives that might appeal to voters to provide a sense of the U.S. role in international affairs. However, at the last meeting of the study group on U.S. global engagement, we also tackled the reality that among the electorate, especially since the 2016 election, there […]

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More Emerging Narratives for U.S. Foreign Policy

| June 2019

I had the signal honor of taking part in a conference sponsored by the Aspen Institute Congressional Program, which gave me an opportunity to hear other emerging narratives that could develop as a way to provide a story and explanation for the scope and degree of American engagement in global affairs. After all, members of […]

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Emerging Narratives for U.S. Foreign Policy

| May 2019

Over the past year and a half, the U.S. Global Engagement program has been examining the causes of “narrative collapse” with regards to American foreign policy. Having made some preliminary conclusions about the disconnect between what U.S. politicians and experts have been articulating and the concerns of the citizenry, as we move into the 2020 […]

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Wichita and American Global Engagement

| May 2019

I had the honor and privilege to be a guest of the Wichita Committee on Foreign Relations, to dialogue with their members about the role and scope of U.S. global engagement. It was a rich and varied discussion, and this summary can’t do it justice, but I wanted to share some of the key takeaways […]

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What Americans Want

| May 2019

The Center for American Progress has released their exhaustive survey of what Americans want in foreign policy–and their results track closely with the conclusions reached by the U.S. global engagement study group. The CAP report concludes: Debates about maintaining the rules-based international order, working with allies through global alliances and multilateral institutions, promoting democracy, and […]

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The Generational Divide?

| May 2019

In discussing the issue of American engagement in the world, one cannot escape the question of the generational divide. As millennials and “Generation Z” begin to enter the ranks of both American politics as well as the expert community, will they share the same assumptions about the role of the United States in international affairs […]

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