Nikolas Gvosdev

Nikolas Gvosdev is a professor of national security studies at the U.S. Naval War College, and serves as Senior Fellow, U.S. Global Engagement Program.

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Nikolas Gvosdev's Latest Posts

Difficult Ethical Choices on China

| July 2020

Andrew Sullivan pulls no punches: It’s time we treated China as the rogue dictatorship it is. When a totalitarian nation is enacting genocide, has a dictator for life, is showing itself to be a health menace to humankind, has crushed an island of democracy it pledged to protect, and is militarily acting out against its […]

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Where Do Human Rights Fit In?

Policy Narratives Re-examined

| July 2020

Nahal Toosi has a fascinating read in Politico about a subtle but major shift in the international landscape: human rights groups focusing on the United States’s human rights record. While there has always been criticism of America’s shortcomings in living up to its own self-professed standards (as well as the terms of international treaties signed […]

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The Breonna Taylor/George Floyd Narrative?

Impacts on U.S. Foreign Policy and International Standing

| June 2020

If the Covid-19 pandemic has called into question America’s role as leader of the world community of nations, will the killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd by law enforcement personnel–and the subsequent protests and demonstrations that have resulted, both in the United States and around the world–have an impact on U.S. foreign policy? In […]

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Vox Populi: After the Event

| June 2020

This past week, the Carnegie Council (virtually) hosted Mark Hannah of the Eurasia Group Foundation and Dina Smeltz of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs to discuss what Americans think about foreign policy and how this relates to the forthcoming election. The “Vox Populi” discussion reiterated earlier themes that policymakers and politicians must, as Smeltz […]

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TIGRE: The Missing Link?

Operationalizing the Democratic Community Narrative

| May 2020

The “democratic community” narrative sounds appealing on paper: decoupling from autocracies and reorienting both security and economic ties to allies who share similar values. Yet while these themes often find their way into speeches and addresses, they have proven difficult to translate into practical policies. Does the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as renewed concerns about […]

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Further on Pandemics, Solidarity and Narratives

| April 2020

Building on an earlier piece in Ethics and International Affairs on the erosion of international solidarity in a time of pandemic, the Carnegie Council held a webinar this past week to explore the question of dissolving ethics at a time when globalization is fracturing. A point raised in that discussion: My sense is that when […]

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Senator Sanders Departs … But What of His Foreign Policy Narrative?

| April 2020

Senator Bernie Sanders has ended his campaign to obtain the Democratic Party’s nomination for the Presidency, but said that he will remain on primary ballots continue to amass delegates in an effort, as he put it, to shape the direction of the party. For his part, the presumptive nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, has […]

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Covid-19: Eroding the Ethics of Solidarity?

| April 2020

One reason why I have never been a fan of the term “international community” is because I am not sure that the politicians and pundits who use the term have fully accepted the ethical commitments that come from naming something as a community. A community, if understood in the context of the classical Greek term […]

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