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<i>EIA</i> Interview with Karin Aggestam on Sweden’s Feminist Foreign Policy

EIA Interview with Karin Aggestam on Sweden’s Feminist Foreign Policy

| September 28, 2016

In this interview, Professor Karin Aggestam of Lund University discusses Sweden’s feminist foreign policy, both in theory and in practice. Aggestam’s essay on this topic, which she co-authored with her colleague Professor Annika Bergman-Rosamond, appears in the Fall 2016 issue of Ethics & International Affairs.

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<i>EIA</i> Fall 2016 Issue—Out now!

EIA Fall 2016 Issue—Out now!

| September 28, 2016

We are pleased to announce the publication of the third issue in EIA’s 30th anniversary volume. The Fall 2016 issue of Ethics & International Affairs is out now! It features essays on the Paris climate change agreement, and on Swedish feminist foreign policy; articles on self-interest and the distant vulnerable, the use of public reason in international courts, and more.






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Autonomous Weapon Diplomacy: The Geneva Debates

Autonomous Weapon Diplomacy: The Geneva Debates

| September 27, 2016

The third and most recent informal experts’ meeting on lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) took place in April 2016 at the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) in Geneva. In this paper, Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer addresses the procedure, negotiations, the balance of power, and diplomatic dimension of the last round of Geneva debates.






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Robots as “Evil Means”? A Rejoinder to Jenkins and Purves

| September 15, 2016

The notion that some means of waging war are mala in se is a confronting one. Surely, any weapon can be used for good or ill? Philosophers often try to justify the category of mala in se by suggesting that some weapons are inherently incapable of being used in accordance with the just war principles of distinction and proportionality.






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Robots and Respect: A Response to Robert Sparrow

| September 15, 2016

Robert Sparrow recently argued in this journal that several initially plausible arguments in favor of the deployment of autonomous weapon systems (AWS) in warfare are in fact flawed, and that the deployment of AWS faces a serious moral objection.






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Ethics and Inequality: A Strategic and Practical View

Ethics and Inequality: A Strategic and Practical View

| September 15, 2016

Deng Xiaoping once said, “Let some get rich first, the others will follow.” This is Angus Deaton’s basic view in The Great Escape. Deaton, cowinner of the Leontief Prize in 2014 and winner of the Nobel Prize in 2015, chronicles the rise of almost all of humanity out of conditions of widespread hunger, disease, destitution, and premature death, and into a world where infant and child mortality has fallen sharply, and where heart diseases and even cancers are declining.






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Self-Interest and the Distant Vulnerable

| September 15, 2016

What interests do states have in assisting and protecting vulnerable populations beyond their borders? Today, confronted as we are with civil wars, mass atrocities, and humanitarian catastrophes that have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of civilians and generated the displacement of sixty million more, this question is as urgent as it has ever been.






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Should International Courts Use Public Reason?

| September 15, 2016

Is public reason an appropriate ideal for international courts? Since the early 1990s various political philosophers and legal scholars have argued that supreme courts should “use public reason” or abide by an “ideal of public reason.”






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