RSSThe Ethics of War and Peace

Peace as a Transnational Theme

| May 31, 2013

To consider war and peace purely in the context of international relations is insufficient, even anachronistic. What we need is less an international than a transnational idea of peace.

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Concepts of Peace: From 1913 to the Present

| May 31, 2013

The Great War and its imagery imprinted itself on the human imagination. In poetry and prose, photography, art, film, and other modes of expression, its influence on cultural memory and identity, on modern meaning and human sensibility, has been remarkable.

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Viewing Peace Through Gender Lenses

| May 31, 2013

Feminist theorizing of peace suggests a number of transformative observations. Feminist perspectives focus a critical lens on the meaning of peace, often making invisible violence visible; help to critically interrogate the role of the United States in furthering “peace” in the international arena; and make different theoretical and policy prescriptions than perspectives that omit gender from their analyses.

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Power Transitions, Global Justice, and the Virtues of Pluralism

| May 31, 2013

Today’s optimists stress the degree to which globalization appears much more firmly institutionalized than it was a hundred years ago, the rather striking success of global economic governance in responding to the financial crisis of 2007–2008, and the longer-term trend within international society to move away from major-power war. Pessimists are less sure.

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Contemporary Just War Thinking: Which Is Worse, to Have Friends or Critics?

| February 14, 2013

The increasingly widespread and energetic engagement with the idea of just war over the last fifty years of thinking on morality and armed conflict—especially in English-speaking countries—presents a striking contrast to the previous several centuries, going back to the early 1600s, in which thinkers addressing moral issues related to war did so without reference to the just war idea.

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Divisions within the Ranks? The Just War Tradition and the Use and Abuse of History

| February 14, 2013

Have the critics of the historical approach to just war theory landed it a knock-out blow, or can it withstand the bricks and bats that have been hurled its way? This article will elucidate four of the most hard-hitting charges levied at the historical approach, and evaluate its continuing utility in light of them.

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Just War Thinking as a Social Practice

| February 14, 2013

Given the niche occupied by just war thinking in contemporary policy discourse, it is worth asking several basic questions about the just war vocabulary. What purposes does it (or can it) serve? What is the nature of its authority? How does or ought just war thinking proceed? Or, to put it another way, how does one recognize “good” just war thinking?

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From Jus ad Bellum to Jus ad Vim: Recalibrating Our Understanding of the Moral Use of Force

Just war scholars often do not differentiate between force and war, but rather talk about bellum justum as if all uses of force implied the same moral challenges. The tendency is therefore to evaluate forces short of war through the lens of jus ad bellum. We question whether this assumption is warranted.

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